Our Haunted Edwardian beauty gazes at us with a glazed eye, sees our past and our future for the 2016 Midisparks Halloween Composers Contest.

Title:

Edwardian Haunted

Suggested:

art photo print

Price:

$18

Dimensions:

8" X 12"


Even as we admire this red-haired Edwardian beauty something unsettles us. Look carefully at her eyes. Or should we say her eye and her glass eye? The effect of one eye looking directly at the camera and one eye at nothing is haunting, suggests some eerie narrative, some spooky backstory.

But let us at least acknowledge and admire what we plainly see before us, an attractive young woman with fiery red hair decked out in grand Edwardian style. She presents in a turtle-shell evening wrap and a wide brimmed hat of the same turtle-shell material. Her neck is elegantly wrapped in a fur muff. Silver gloves cover her hands, one of which is occupied with a small brown clutch bag.

We might imagine that the single rose fastened below the muff shines some some light on her perfect peaches and cream complexion, and we are thus drawn to the face, and as a result again to the troubling aspect of the glass eye. The response we have to that lifeless orb is at least two-fold. Of course we sympathize with obvious loss. But we are creeped out as well. For though the eye does not look outward at anything, we might imagine yet that it “sees”. It suggests some mystical, spiritual knowledge and awareness.

Composers Burton Philbrick and Dan Goldstein pick up on this eerie, metaphysical theme with a cinematic audio track relating a seance. The composers imagine our Edwardian beauty as a medium, convoking a gathering for the purpose of communicating with the deceased. Goldstein’s whole tone harp counterpoint creates a mysterious ambience, spellbinding, over which Philbrick lays a bowed cigar box guitar and several seance sound effects.

We believe that the audio narrative deepens our appreciation for this beautiful colorization of a vintage Edwardian era photo. We hope the presentation will inspire your visit to the art shop and purchase of a print.


History

Submit a Comment