Strange Haunting

Strange Haunting

A ghostly red, tentacled monster haunts this old Victorian mansion. In this convincing portrayal of demonic possession, artist Gerald Sawyer creates a supernatural effect with a pallete dominated by reds. Has our beast descended from the bloody sky? And before that – from where? What horrible crime at sea was committed by the resident of this cursed abode, such that this octopus-like creature would visit and possess? Beyond the possibilities for background narrative, we are amazed at the artist’s technique. Fantasy monsters rarely disturb your humble blogger. But this creature is frightening and creepy, its probing tentacles finding passages in through windows, and out through doorways. This may not be art for the living room. Perhaps it will work in the teenagers hideout or the man-cave. 100 prints ONLY of this ferocious tentacled beast are available through our affiliation with Yessy. We invite you to click over on the shopping cart link and secure your...
Ghost

Ghost

A lost and twisted spirit, this ghost exists in a world of torment and pain. It’s contorted body, perhaps a symbiont of human and a creature unknown, moves malevolently and yet majestically in time with the dark haunting melody. Demanding attention, the ghost has already entered your soul. It’s power is strong! Hypnotising it’s prey, you’ve stared too long and now the ghost has captured you! There is no escape! The ghost snares you almost hypnotically, pulling you deeper into it’s world, entwining you in the reality of it’s living nightmare. You are lost! Now you submit to the rhythm. Your body moves, sways and contorts in tandem with the dark and eerie sound, as you compliantly bow down to the dark and ghostly overlord. You cannot fight back. Your spirit, your soul has been submitted. You are now enslaved! The ghost twists and turns, keeping perfect time with the musical heartbeat. It engulfs you in mist of greyness that you try to resist, but you cannot. Shape shifting and changing, it entwines you within it’s very core. Soon you will become one with the ghost as it consumes yet another soul. The ghost is evolving. It is host to the souls of the living. It consumes, it wants to live and become stronger. It is unstoppable! A twisted host of pain and nothingness, it now has you within. You are as one with this ghost for all eternity. Confined, you dance together in a world of purgatory. We are fortunate to be presenting the art of Sefkat Islegen. You may inquire about purchase of the original at the...
Ghostly Woods

Ghostly Woods

We are definitely anticipating a Halloween fest soon in these ghostly woods. The parade is apparently just around the corner, as the Crucethus audio track hints. It seems artist Bertha Hamilton finds just the right balance between reality and the supernatural in this abstract depiction of two leafless trees touching branches on a a moonlit night. Of course a strong moon could light up the trees SOMEWHAT, but what are the chances of such completely ghostly white trees? The are clearly spirit possessed. Likewise, the ground below could reveal some hints of blue from moonlight’s reflection on snow. But again, Bertha’s blue ground is plasma like – extraterrestrial! So some basic elements are in place to give us the desired Halloween shiver. And perhaps we expect an audio track full of whistling wind and howling wolves. And yes – that would work well. But unexpectedly, composer Crucethus takes us on a very different ride, really suggests a completely different narrative for the painting. We can’t do better than some of the comments on this track that have appeared so far over at Looperman. Crucethus: Thanks Ed, join the black parade of the half brained zombie like voodoo encrusted soldiers of funk as we give it to you dark like on this spookiest of spooky nights yet to come. (sic. queue the evil laughter, maniacally)and if you don´t have much brain left, then your safe from the brain eating zombies. As they won touch your brain, but they will devour your soul. (ooh that went all dark, didn´t it) Anyhow, glad u enjoyed this one. Phatkatz: I picture an undead...
Ghost Ships in the Storm

Ghost Ships in the Storm

Why might we suspect that these are not normal sailing vessels but ghost ships?  Is it that sails, masts, and even hulls are lightning white, as if permeated by some supernatural charge?  Is it that despite the hurricane raging about, sky and sea concentrating into a ferocious maelstrom, that the the ships themselves are eerily, calmly stationed.  Really, do these ships weather the tempest or create it?  Or perhaps they are birthed from it. It seems that a necessary condition for ghost ships is to be unmanned.  Of that we have no evidence.  In this acrylic painting from the Kozyuk gallery, it is primarily the abstraction of a storm into something quite unearthly which leads us to conclude that the ships themselves are not of this world.  At the giving of the Law on Sinai tradition teaches that G-d bent the sky down to the mountain.  It was surely an awesome act, but as surely a beneficent one.  In our painting the sky likewise reaches down to converge with rising waves.  But there is no good intention here, no blessing.  Rather, nature, if this be nature, is raging, threatening, wreaking havoc and revenge.  Regardless if these ships were delivered by nature or themselves agitated nature into the current condition, we have good reason to fear them. The audio by SkarredKage adds energy and anxiety to our viewing.  But we are not offered the force of howling winds, or thundering drums, or power chords.  The energy derives from the repetitive chatter of spirits and robots, of unearthly elements that are calculating and in control.  The composer’s audio elements confirm for us what we cannot certify from the painting...
Ghost of a Guitar

Ghost of a Guitar

There were probably instances of a ghost guitar in the illustrations I enjoyed as a child in Highlights Magazine.    Highlights featured a find-the-image illustration each month, packed with hidden images on a particular theme – cats, flowers, buckets.  There is a lot of that find-the-image game going on for me in this colorfully detailed illustration by artist Kenneth Carnes. Armed with the title’s hint we begin examining this veiled illustration for evidence of the guitar and it is not difficult to find.  The guitar strings along a winding neck are an easy discovery.  Of course we can then follow the neck down to the soundboard.  Along the way we discover the fingers of a ghostly hand. It is curious, perhaps troubling, that those fingers are tangled in the strings.  Is this ghost guitar revenge? The other discoveries are perhaps tougher because unexpected.  Is that a recorder, left center, which emits music like a wisp of smoke?  Do you see birds? Leaves?  There is something of the magic garden about the illustration.  And what about the angry bulldog face in the upper left corner?  Are those a pair of pom-poms coming out of his head to the right? The disparity of imagery, hidden as it may be, creates an ambiguity of mood.  The piece is not entirely spooky, although the entangled hand is creepy.  But there is a light hearted, even silly aspect to the drawing as well. The audio, however, is not ambiguous.  Guitarist Burton Philbrick chooses one of his electrified cigar box 4-strings to create a murky, solemn ambience with slow paced chords and sliding solos. The...
Ghost Filled Night

Ghost Filled Night

Three white ghosts flying about in a petrified woods are up to no good in this fanciful Halloween Art by Nancy Winters. They are compact, faceless, emotionless, bearing wings like capes, or capes like wings. They are amoral agents (of whom?) on their silent mission of destruction. Some poor dog, having wandered unknowingly into this woods, is now likewise petrified. The ghosts did it! Unnaturally close yellow and blue stars twinkle cheerfully, ironically, as if there is anything good about fresh green woods, or flesh or blood, turning stone dead. We could have offered a more benign discussion of Nancy’s fanciful painting. The ghosts are cute, delicate, unexpectedly graceful. The wooden dog is a nice surrealistic touch. Colorful stars in close proximity create magical charm. But the audio of composer Elize Kaisser does not so easily permit such a happy approach. This is haunting music for a haunted scene. The heavy effecting with reverb and rapid fire panning suggest something intentional is afoot in the art, and not for the good. This featured art for the 2016 Midisparks Halloween Music Contest is offered through affiliation with Yessy, and the sales link will take you to that site. You will want to contact the artist about the painting. This painting will be a significant addition to your collection. It’s haunt will endure.  ...
Black Trees

Black Trees

In this eery painting by Ron Kendall, a haunted woods of leafless black trees follows the curves of an icy, receding path. Sky and horizon are segmented into bands of glowing purples, lavenders, blues, violets.  Or perhaps some supernatural vapor permeates the frozen air. Twisted branches reach upward, seem animated, engaged in some ancient and secret rite of worship.  The trees are supercharged, electrified.  Jagged white veins, sharp slivers of lightning, form a ubiquitous weave within them. The secrecy of the ritual itself is so coveted, perhaps, that the unsuspecting wanderer into its midst cannot be tolerated. Was some poor woman, in her floor length dress, fully absorbed into foremost tree? Do you see the profile there? At Halloween time we dare to scare. But the spooky season also explores, in more subtle ways, our relationship with the unknown – with death, with the mysteries of nature. The season is a time of profound transition from the vitality of spring and summer to the (temporary) death of winter.  For despite the wintry scene before us, we are fully aware of an energy, a spirit, a presence. The audio track by Pete Tebar does not take us all the way to the terrifying possibility that a woman was absorbed in one of the trees. But it does provide an ambience suitable for the ancient rite, or for our own emotions in confronting this mysterious scene. The woodblocks especially, deep and reverberating, seem the very voice of this haunted woods. We are excited to offer the painting for sale as an affiliate to the Yessy site.  Prints are also available.  Visit Yessy with a click on...
Haunted Mansion and Castle

Haunted Mansion and Castle

A haunted mansion and castle are created by photographer Shelley Neff with creative colorization and filtering techniques. Composer Joe Cramer offers a dark and foreboding audio track which relentlessly sustains the ambience of tension and mystery. In the first image, the looming gothic edifice seems to push out from the darkness and crack the canvas. Or perhaps the jagged black border and leafless trees are about to swallow up the castle entirely.PURCHASE CAUGHT UP IN THE RAPTURE ART PHOTO PRINT IN THE ART SHOP PURCHASE HAUNTED ZEMBO SHRINE ART PHOTO PRINT IN THE SHOPIn the second image, Harrisburg, PA’s Zembo Shrine is transformed into a haunted mansion. An upward looking camera angle serves to emphasize the looming, towering aspect of this old stone edifice. The arched windows are black, gothically pointed. Shadows form thick bands, punctuated by fragments of supernatural blue, across the facade. The branches of leafless trees hang limply, desperately. Shelley works with the limited amount of available moonlight which diffuses through a cloudy sky. Where Shelley allows that light to concentrate creates a cool and creepy experience. For example, notice the concentration of light on the right side of the landing. Our eye is drawn up dark stairs to this spot. We thus get up close and personal with the foreboding structure. Just enough light outlines the long arching windows at the top to make us chillingly aware of the pitch darkness within. And yet we wonder at the internal source of light that allows us to distinguish red stained glass in smaller windows...
Edwardian Haunted

Edwardian Haunted

Even as we admire this red-haired Edwardian beauty something unsettles us. Look carefully at her eyes. Or should we say her eye and her glass eye? The effect of one eye looking directly at the camera and one eye at nothing is haunting, suggests some eerie narrative, some spooky backstory. But let us at least acknowledge and admire what we plainly see before us, an attractive young woman with fiery red hair decked out in grand Edwardian style. She presents in a turtle-shell evening wrap and a wide brimmed hat of the same turtle-shell material. Her neck is elegantly wrapped in a fur muff. Silver gloves cover her hands, one of which is occupied with a small brown clutch bag. We might imagine that the single rose fastened below the muff shines some some light on her perfect peaches and cream complexion, and we are thus drawn to the face, and as a result again to the troubling aspect of the glass eye. The response we have to that lifeless orb is at least two-fold. Of course we sympathize with obvious loss. But we are creeped out as well. For though the eye does not look outward at anything, we might imagine yet that it “sees”. It suggests some mystical, spiritual knowledge and awareness. Composers Burton Philbrick and Dan Goldstein pick up on this eerie, metaphysical theme with a cinematic audio track relating a seance. The composers imagine our Edwardian beauty as a medium, convoking a gathering for the purpose of communicating with the deceased. Goldstein’s whole tone harp counterpoint creates a mysterious ambience, spellbinding, over which Philbrick lays...
Temptation

Temptation

Artist Frances Lewis presents an image of temptation with apple in hand become serpent of despair. And truly it is a yielding to despair’s lure which makes possible thoughts of self-destruction, of suicide. And why this allusion? It is the audio choice that drives it. We are grateful not only for the artist’s brilliant image, but for her audio track as well. Frances gives us her track ‘Suicide Horizons’ to motivate and influence our contemplation of the visual piece. Here are the lyrics: Suicide Horizons Wont You See Into Theese Eyes Of Mine, Cant You See I Am Broken, I Am Left Just A Lonley Tear, A Whispered Word Unspoken, Chorus And It Feels Like I Cant Go On, All The Angels Come To Me, And It Feels Like It Wont Be Long Untill All The Angels Come To Me, Mam Take Me From Theese Horizons I Feel Raped Of All I Have, Mama Take Me From Theese Horizons Please Take My Hand. Just think about the first line. “Won’t You See Into These Eyes of Mine” What do we see when we look into the serpent eyes? Perhaps something evil, yes. But are these also now the eyes, now possessed, of our sad victim to despair. Perhaps then the image is both serpent and victim (with apple dripping into the girl’s hair). We think the amount of black in the canvas is a powerful part of the presentation. Frances’ thought-provoking image is available in the Art Shop. We hope you will click over and patronize our featured artist by clicking the Shopping Cart button...
Torn

Torn

We have very few self-portrait presentations on the site, so it is fantastic to be able to think about the impact of artist Frances Lewis’ creative presentation of her own image here along with audio. The single word title of the presentation gives us a hint of something hard going on. That Frances is Torn reveals in the black wound above her left eye and in the cross-hatch on gray beneath her face. Frances’ face emerging out of blackness likewise sends a powerful signal of some struggle. For we could just as easily imagine that she is not emerging from, but fading into the black, that something hard is closing in, enveloping her. The audio accompanying the image is Frances’ own “Black” Before we even read the lyrics, we sensed from her voice a kind of torment in process, slow boiling. But unsurprisingly, there is also a boiling over with a drop and a hard hitting section featuring some awesome crying guitar. Checking out the lyrics seems to confirm the theory and we give over the lyrics here. Verse I Try To Close He Holds Me Down, I See The Stairs That I Can Climb, But I Cant Fight My Way, Screaming But No One Is Alarmed, I Try To Hide But He Holds Me Down, I See The Stairs But I Cant Climb, But I Cant Find My Way, Screaming No One Is Alarmed, My Skin Turns Black, Black, Chorus I’m Worth More Than A Bruise, If You Thing I Can Forgive All The Times You Abuse Please Think Again, Of All Reasons I’ll Escape From You. Bridge...
Ravine Variation 6

Ravine Variation 6

Artist ViVaDa treats us to a curiously abstracted ravine in his watercolor painting. The essentials of the natural formation are present. There is a central depression from which root-ribbed banks rise steeply on either side. The banks are impossibly smooth, impossbly perfect quarter-circles down to the riverbed’s midpoint. The thick roots ascend above the banks now, always veiled in pastel shadows. They are ghostly trunks, devoid of leaf or branch, which arch in again up above. And the light pours in. Is this creek’s flow pure light? Is the source, the inundation at the gate, for good or not? What alternate universe creates these slippery, cylindrical, purple shores? Abstraction in the painting invites abstraction and fantasy in the audio. Composer Pete Tebar builds on percussion hits in an odd meter, lent by collaboration partner Dan Goldstein, to suggest a spooky walk through this otherworldly ravine. In this world it is not the drone of insects, but that of sustained bells which forms the sonic foundation. Witch screams, whip cracks, irregular bass drum heartbeats, are the slightly threatening threads weaving the introduction to this audio tapestry. But now the track’s pace quickens. The audio has decided for us – we will move definitely toward that light. Was it for the good? The somber finish leaves us less than certain. The Midisparks Art Sales abstract art collection includes two entries by artist and composer Elise K and three entries by artist and composer ViVaDa. All of them are available as art photo prints in the Midisparks Art Sales...
Greenland Skull

Greenland Skull

Should we laugh or shiver at artist ViVaDa’s Greenland Skull art?  Blond braids adorning this probably bovine skull with wide set eye sockets not quite aligned might suggest a laugh.  The golden locks, fashioned it seems as viking horns, angle down left against eyes angling right.  Swirling mosses and grasses in the digital background complete the rendering’s dizzying effect.  So after staring for some time at this image (and how can we not but hold with the image for some time as we are likewise captivated by the hypnotic Joe Kramer/Burton Philbrick audio track), the mind begins to spin a bit and the stomach slightly to turn.  This is good, for we are inclined then to contemplate more serious implications of this skull art.  The rich yellow hair braids speak of course not of death but of attractive youth and life that once was.  Joe’s lyrics speak directly to this: Once I had a life Once I felt so great Once I had some good times but now . . . I am dead. Audio can guide us beyond initial reactions to images (in this case chuckles) to potentially more complex responses (in this case feelings about our mortality).  At the most fundamental level, a thoughtful bit of audio may keep us engaged with the painting a little longer than otherwise might be the case, and as a result there is time to think more deeply about the images.  Our audio provides an explicit narrative, even animates the image.  We visit with not only the remains of the deceased, but with the ghost as well, who shares with us her story...
Ravine Variation 5

Ravine Variation 5

When we contemplate artist Karsten’s ravine painting, we experience a subtle form of abstraction even as the figures are recognizable. The abstraction is mostly in color choices. If not for blue trees, trees would be more recognizable as such. But that they are blue allows them to be something else in addition. They are walls. They are monsters. They are tall gates guarded vigilantly against those who deserve not the light at the end of the journey, on the other side. And really the painting seems mostly about that light. The facts of riverbed and shorelines and arboreal canopies are secondary. They form a conduit, a funnel, a passage to our goal. Karsten’s color scheme, mostly a wash of purples and blues, guides our focus to the function over the form. Composer Klandestyne’s audio track provides both ambient and narrative elements. The composer asked if drums should be scratched to allow the track to stand on purely ambient legs. But it is precisely the energy of the snare which propels us into the painting and engages us in the adventure, the journey toward the light. We are enormously grateful for the opportunity to be offering premium quality prints of Karsten’s watercolors. Please visit our shop by clicking the shopping cart...
What is Scary?

What is Scary?

The gargoyle provides a method of drainage which protects the stone and mortar of churches, cathedrals and castles. It is also scary as hell. The creature, usually designed with human, animal and purely fantasy elements, alludes to ancient myth, legend, and pagan religion. It promises temporal suffering for rebellious serfs; and for sinners, eternal damnation. Perhaps the modern mind, unlike the medieval one, awash in superstitious belief, is not so alarmed by the gargoyle’s threat. Nevertheless, the old technique which empowers Monsieur Gargouille (Old French – probably throat) with the ability to scare, remains the engine today for the most impactful terror art. What scares us is rooted in reality and has a context or an implied narrative. Being rooted in reality is about imagery which is realistic and to which we can relate. These are the natural elements of our own bodies and of the world around us, man-made or otherwise. Context is the presence of an actual or implied narrative. Context stirs our imagination and gets us to storytelling. It is possible, for example, that the spookiest portrayals of haunted houses are photographs, not paintings. Why might that be? Here is an example with some of the elements that make the haunt. Here we have Shelly Neff’s night photo of the Zembo Shrine in Harrisburg, PA. An upward looking camera angle serves to emphasize the looming, towering aspect of this old stone edifice. The arched windows are black, gothically pointed. Shadows form thick bands, punctuated by fragments of supernatural blue, across the facade. The branches of leafless trees hang limply, desperately. Artist Gerald Sawyer haunts us from...