Ice Covered Tree

Ice Covered Tree

An ice covered tree in winter seems ablaze in radiant light. Artist Jerry Langell does an amazing job with the color blue in his digital treatment of an Oroville, California tree in winter. That we do not see the base of the tree, but rather that it emerges from blackness, sets a mysterious tone to the piece. Without doubt there is some ambiguity here, some mystery about the origin of this blazing white labyrinth. We are full of wonder at the energy drawn from this natural source (the ice) through artistic license. There are several ways to go with abstracting an ice covered tree. The artist can zoom into the ice itself and emphasize the variations of texture and reflection. But in this case the artist studies external projections of energy by the ice. His representation of that energy with a shimmering shade of blue that sets off beautifully from the deeper blue of the sky is very satisfying. But perhaps the artist suggests something entirely unnatural. Some invisible power has bathed the tree in a blinding electrical charge. Perhaps this perception ties more directly with the mysterious tone set by pitch black origins at the bottom of the canvas. We could easily suspect some haunting afoot. Ghosts and spirits have taken possession. We do not get a sense of evil, however, but rather of a benificent supernatural energy that is attracted and attaches to objects in nature. Composer Stohgs succeeds in conveying the electrical energy of the painting, particularly with the introduction of a static tinged, quacking synth. But really the entire groove suggests the vibration of energized...
Death Cycle

Death Cycle

I see the frontal shadow of a black motorcycle on the right bottom portion of the canvas. I imagine two scenarios in this bold, even violent abstract by Serbian artist and composer Danijela Jovic. On the one hand, motorcycle and rider have been squashed against a white wall. Oil and blood splatter. Or perhaps we tilt the entire viewpoint 90 degrees, such that motorcycle lies flat on the ground, front wheel turned upwards. The rider is off the canvas – likely unconscious on the ground. Blood and oil form streaks on white snow. The audio of Hugues Racine aka ‘Stale’ is hard hitting but extremely upbeat. Hugues shares that the track was written in memory of a friend who died in a motorcycle accident. The track is the biker’s celebration of freedom. Clearly the composer opted to celebrate his friend’s life in the track. But how to reconcile the harsh, violent brushstrokes of the painting. Or does the music lead you to a completely different response to the visual? The painting speaks of a wipeout. I see the black outline of a motorcycle in the lower right corner. It seems the rider slammed into a wall and the forward energy is conveyed in grotesque splashes of blood and oil against the white surface. It is a dramatic, if tragic ending to a life well-lived – a life which took freedom by the handlebars and rode it for all it was worth. And surely this is at least one connection we can make between Danijela’s painting and the celebratory rock track of Canadian rocker Hugues Racine. We learn from Hugues...
Autumn At Wildwood

Autumn At Wildwood

Winding around the central marshes of the Wildwood Nature Conservancy is a tree sheltered and hilly hiker/biker path. Every now and then, and unexpectedly, you will emerge from a wooded portion of the path into a gorgeous view of the nature preserve’s central marshes. And without calling upon too much additional good fortune, you will discover a loon, or egret, or heron, and countless smaller birds, posing along the shores or flitting upon the surface of the water. The hum of insects, especially on a hot summer day, is something akin to a loud alternating electric current. Chirping and screeching offer soprano and tenor layers to the bass drone. The effect of photographing this scene is to create an emphasis on the stillness of the scene and the warmth of autumn’s gently changing colors. But this emphasis belies a co-existing reality of unseen energies and activities – the ecosystem busily engaged. Here the audio steps in to complete the story. Composer Dan Goldstein uses synth sounds to simulate insects buzzing, frogs croaking, birds screeching, in a blended way which speaks of the active system in play. Goldstein contemplates, for an extended audio track, what a wildlife midnight dance might sound like in these Harrisburg marshlands. We think photographer Shelley Neff’s capture of the Wildwood Nature Conservancy is a wonderful entry into the greeting card collection. The rich yellows and oranges sweep fully across the card. The product is an art piece in its own right – beautiful imagery on a large, linen-finished greeting card. We invite you to click over to the Midisparks Art Shop and place your order....