Tang Monarch Butterfly

Tang Monarch Butterfly

For this pollinating butterfly, we would expect some bucolic theme – a gentle pad on a sweet major chord, with a slow-moving bit of melody wafting over. But the composer explores less romantic aspects of the image. The butterfly is an insect engaged in pollination. She is part of system quite different from ours. Really, hers is a world quite apart from ours, alien, potentially hostile. When we meditate upon nature, there is an aspect of mystery, of foreignness, in systems very different than ours. The music seeks to capture some of that other worldliness. It hopes to create a sonic ambiance resonating with the quiet, focused business of this pollinating butterfly. And then of course, through repetition, and the trance-like condition that can create, it hopes to hold our focus on the details of the creature, such as the coloration of wings. Composer TheHumps had this to say about the image and audio: I’ve never looked at a butterfly and thought of it as ever being aggressive or industrious but I suppose at some time it has to go about his butterfly world taking the good as well as the bad. The drum part at the beginning I thought of as it’s tiny heart beating and starting it’s day. Then comes the stress and tension of the daily life of a butterfly, fighting winds, looking for a bite to eat and avoiding bug zappers. We have chosen photographer Shelley Neff’s ‘Tang’ for the Midisparks greeting card collection. Generally we look for images that fill the card with color or otherwise have a certain fullness in the subject which...
Fall of the Monarch

Fall of the Monarch

Artist Tabitha Borges animates her monarch butterfly photograph with a fascinating superimposition effect, an effect that creates a sense of motion and a third dimension. Tabitha offers, “I used the card board filter lens made by Grandfather Robert Thompson to clone 4 objects. Then I went to Co-rel Pro Nine and adobe Paint to stretch and filter the piece. . .” In the artist’s work we see two butterflies which seem to be lifting off. They fly upward. White bursts of color beneath the butterflies along with a few vertical white lines suggests thrust. Finally, all that remains of our Monarch pair are these white bursts and a little bit of wing, for our butterflies have flown off the top of the photo. But there is also a sense of motion directly into the photograph. We see the right butterfly wing in the lower left and upper right quadrants which seems to be receding directly into the field. Composer Stohgs’ musical response to the animated image has impact for its restraint. Stohgs chooses a laid-back feel, with his chordal progression outlined delicately by bell-like tones from an electric piano. An electric guitar riff descends over this gentle texture. The music reminds us of the essentially delicate quality of the butterflies themselves. The descending sonic riff somehow slows down the ascending motion in the image, and suggests that this motion upward is graceful, measured. Stohgs offers, “The Butterfly – a simple design with so much twist in its detail. When gazed upon it while in its natural habitat giving a sense of relaxation and alertness. With the audio provided may...